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Materials to craft a Vinyl Station record cabinet

We make Vinyl Station’s in our Geelong and Melbourne workshops from sustainable materials, including recycled HDPE plastic and reclaimed Australian hardwood. These two materials are sustainable, and have different and appealing qualities. Qualities include the ability to introduce a tone, impact, or a characteristic the matches the room. Furniture and feature pieces allow you to make a statement. And we believe a Vinyl Station will establish not only a functional area where it’s easy to flip and play, but also visual talking point whilst showcasing your precious vinyl collection.



Recycled HDPE colour swatches


Below are some of the most popular colour swatches in HDPE recycled plastic. We can custom make a specific colour and mix of a wide range of colours. For example, black with 10% white speckle




Recycled HDPE plastic


HDPE (High-Density Polyethylene) is a type of plastic commonly used for products such as milk cartons and lids, detergent bottles, and other consumer packaging. HDPE is known for its strength, durability, and resistance to chemicals and UV radiation.


Recycling HDPE plastic involves collecting, sorting, and cleaning used plastic containers, which are then processed and melted down into small pellets. These pellets can be used to make new products, including plastic lumber, drainage pipes, and other construction materials. Vinyl Station sources post consumer HDPE plastic sheets, and craft these into any design required to suit your Hi Fi equipment.





Recycling HDPE plastic has several benefits, including reducing waste, conserving natural resources such as, and reducing the demand for virgin plastics and materials that increase demand. Using recycled HDPE is a smart choice and supports the circular economy, plus diverts post consumer plastic that was destined for landfill. The Australian Government’s Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment states that only 13% of post consumer and industrial waste is recycled.



Reclaimed timber


Reclaimed timber is wood that has been salvaged and repurposed from old structures such as buildings, wharves or piers and bridges. Reclaimed wood has already been used in construction or other applications and is then saved from being discarded or destroyed. Reclaimed timber is a precious resource, once harvested from old growth forests that are no longer available.

The process of salvaging reclaimed timber involves carefully deconstructing old structures and then sorting, cleaning, and preparing the wood for reuse. The wood is typically de-nailed, cleaned, and cut to size, and then undergoes a process of drying and treatment to remove any insects or rot.




reclaimed messmate timber
Reclaimed messmate timber


Reclaimed timber has become increasingly popular in recent years due to its unique character, durability, and environmental benefits. It can be used for a wide range of applications, including flooring, furniture, panelling, and beams. Reclaimed timber is often sought after for its natural beauty, rich history, and the unique patterns and textures that come from years of wear and tear.

Using reclaimed timber also has several environmental benefits, including reducing the demand for new wood products, preserving old-growth forests, and reducing the amount of wood waste that ends up in landfills. Additionally, the process of salvaging and reusing old wood can help to reduce carbon emissions and mitigate the effects of climate change.


We source reclaimed timber from two trusted suppliers, Whelan The Warehouse in Port Melbourne, and Timberzoo in Geelong, Australia.



Australian hardwood


Australian hardwood refers to timber species that are native to Australia, including some of the most durable and long-lasting hardwoods in the world. These hardwoods are known for their strength, durability, and resistance to decay and termite damage, making them a popular choice for a wide range of construction and furniture applications. But most of all, Australian hardwood timber is stunning, with various visual characteristics with grain, patterns and colour.




Custom made record cabinet


Some of the most common Australian hardwoods


Blackbutt: a light-colored hardwood with a straight grain, commonly used for flooring, decking, and outdoor furniture.


Jarrah: a rich red-brown hardwood that is extremely durable and resistant to rot and insect damage, commonly used for flooring, decking, and furniture.

Spotted Gum: a hardwood with a unique spotted appearance and high durability, commonly used for decking, flooring, and outdoor furniture.


Ironbark: a dense and heavy hardwood with a deep red color, commonly used for flooring, decking, and heavy-duty construction applications.


Tallowwood: a strong and durable hardwood with a pale yellow to dark brown color, commonly used for decking, flooring, and outdoor furniture.



Australian hardwoods are also valued for their sustainability, as they are harvested from carefully managed forests and plantations. The timber industry in Australia is highly regulated to ensure that harvesting practices are sustainable and do not harm the environment or local communities.



The beauty of Australian hardwood


There are many beautiful Australian hardwoods, each with its own unique appearance and characteristics. Here area few more species, and they are some of the most stunning Australian hardwoods:


Blackwood: one of the most beautiful Australian hardwoods. A medium to dark brown hardwood with a beautiful grain pattern and occasional black streaks.



Tasmania blackwood tree

Huon Pine: a rare and highly prized hardwood with a creamy white to yellow color and distinctive knots and patterns. It is commonly used for specialty woodworking projects, such as musical instruments and boatbuilding.


Queensland Maple: a light to medium brown hardwood with a striking grain pattern that ranges from straight to wavy. It is commonly used for furniture, joinery, and musical instruments.


Sydney Blue Gum: a medium to dark brown hardwood with a pronounced grain pattern and occasional gum veins. It is commonly used for flooring, decking, and outdoor furniture.


Tasmanian Oak or Victorian Ash: a light-colored hardwood with a uniform grain pattern and occasional gum veins. It is commonly used for furniture, flooring, and joinery.



What is reclaimed DAR timber?


DAR stands for "dressed all round," which refers to the process of planing or machining all four sides of a piece of timber to create a smooth and uniform surface. Reclaimed DAR timber is timber that has been salvaged from old buildings, bridges, wharves and piers, and then machined or planed to create a uniform and consistent surface. Hardwood in Australia has been used for many uses for well over a century. Resulting in a vast resource of ‘end of life’ timber for discontinued wharves, bridges and buildings that have been demolished.


The process of machining reclaimed timber can be challenging, as the timber may be irregular in shape and size, and may contain nails, screws, or other hardware that needs to be removed. However, the end result is a piece of timber that has a unique character and history.


The use of reclaimed DAR timber is becoming increasingly popular in sustainable building and design, as it is a way to reduce waste and reuse valuable resources. Reclaimed timber has a lower environmental impact than new timber, as it does not require the harvesting and processing of new trees. Additionally, the unique character and history of reclaimed timber can add warmth and character to a space, while also providing the durability and strength needed for structural applications.



Blackwood


Australian Blackwood (Acacia melanoxylon) is a member of the wattle family, a medium-sized to tall tree that is native to eastern Australia, including Tasmania.


Colours include light golden brown, to deep brown, occasionally with a reddish tint. A distinctive grain pattern can include streaks, curls, and fiddleback figures, with a natural lustre. These features give blackwood timber a rich, luxurious look that is highly valued in both traditional and contemporary designs, for customers and Australian designers.


Blackwood timber is a popular choice for furniture and cabinetry due to its beautiful appearance and ease of working. It is also commonly used for flooring and paneling, as it is durable and resistant to wear and tear.


Native to south-eastern Australia, where it is found in a range of different forest types, including wet sclerophyll forests, dry sclerophyll forests, and rainforests. Blackwood is distributed throughout a large area of south eastern Australia, including the states of New South Wales, Victoria, Tasmania, South Australia, and southern Queensland. It is most commonly found in the eastern and south eastern parts of the continent, and is often found growing along streams and in damp gullies.


In Tasmania, Blackwood is particularly abundant, however widely protected, and is considered to be an important commercial timber species. Tasmanian Blackwood is highly valued for its beautiful appearance, and is even sourced to craft musical instruments.



Messmate


Messmate (Eucalyptus obliqua) is a tall hardwood tree that is native to south-eastern Australia, including the states of Victoria, New South Wales, and Tasmania. Its wood, known as Messmate timber, is highly valued for its strength, durability, and attractive appearance. Its color and grain can vary greatly, with a range of warm browns, reddish-browns, and even pink tones, and a distinctive grain pattern that can include gum veins and other features.


One of the most appealing features of messmate timber is its unique character. The variation in color and grain gives each piece of timber a one-of-a-kind look, and the presence of gum veins and other features can add to its rustic charm.


Messmate timber is a light to medium brown color, with a straight and even grain and a relatively uniform texture. Its color and grain can vary greatly, with a range of warm browns, reddish-browns, and even pink tones, and a distinctive grain pattern that can include gum veins and other features.


It is a versatile timber that can be used for a wide range of applications, including flooring, decking, furniture, and construction.


The use of reclaimed Messmate timber is becoming increasingly popular in sustainable building and renovation projects, as it is a way to reduce waste and reuse valuable resources. Reclaimed Messmate timber can add character and warmth to a space, while also providing the strength and durability needed for structural applications.


When sourcing reclaimed Messmate timber, it is important to ensure that it comes from a reputable supplier who sources their timber from sustainable and ethical sources. This can help to ensure that the timber has been harvested and processed in an environmentally responsible and socially conscious manner.



Blue Gum


Blue gum timber refers to wood that is harvested from the blue gum tree, which is also known as the eucalyptus globulus tree. The blue gum tree is native to Australia, but it is also commonly found in other parts of the world, such as California, Spain, and Portugal.



Reclaimed Australian Blue Gum hardwood



Huon Pine


Huon pine (Lagarostrobos franklinii) is a slow-growing coniferous tree that is native to southwestern Tasmania, an island state of Australia. It is a highly valued timber species due to its unique properties, including its beautiful appearance, exceptional durability, and resistance to decay.


Huon pine is a small to medium-sized tree that typically grows to a height of 20-30 meters, although some specimens can grow to over 40 meters. It has a narrow, conical crown and a straight trunk with a diameter of up to one meter.


The timber of Huon pine is pale yellow to light brown in colour, with a fine and even texture and a distinctive figure that is highly prized by woodworkers. It has a sweet and spicy aroma that is often compared to sandalwood.


Huon pine is a slow-growing and long-lived species, and many of the trees used for timber are several hundred years old. Due to its slow growth and limited range, Huon pine is considered to be a threatened species, and its harvesting is strictly regulated in order to protect remaining stands of old-growth forest. It is a slow-growing species that is native to the west coast of Tasmania, and can live for over 2000 years.


Here are some reasons why Huon pine is popular:


Durability: Huon pine is a highly durable and decay-resistant timber, making it ideal for outdoor applications such as boat building, decking, and cladding.


Aroma: Huon pine is known for its pleasant aroma, which is often described as spicy or earthy. The scent is released when the timber is cut or sanded, and can linger for many years, making it a popular choice for use in furniture and other indoor applications.


Stability: Huon pine has a low shrinkage rate and is highly stable, which means it is less likely to warp or twist over time. This makes it an ideal choice for use in applications such as joinery, flooring, and panelling.


Beauty: Huon pine has a distinctive appearance, with a warm golden colour and a straight, even grain. It can also feature knots and other natural features, which add to its rustic charm. These features make Huon pine a popular choice for use in furniture, cabinetry, and other high-end joinery applications.


Sustainability: Due to its slow growth rate, Huon pine is a relatively rare and valuable timber, and is subject to strict harvesting regulations. This has helped to promote sustainable harvesting practices, which in turn has contributed to its popularity among those who are environmentally conscious.



Ironbark


The hardest Australian timber, Ironbark is a common name for a group of several closely related tree species that are native to Australia. These trees belong to the genus Eucalyptus and are known for their extremely hard, dense, and durable timber, which has made them highly valued for a wide range of applications, including flooring, decking, poles, and heavy construction.


The timber of Ironbark trees is typically dark red to dark brown in colour, with a distinctive interlocking grain that gives it exceptional strength and durability. It is one of the hardest and heaviest timbers in the world, with a Janka hardness rating of over 14,000 newtons, making it resistant to wear, impact, and termites.


Ironbark trees are widespread throughout Australia, with different species found in different regions of the country. Some of the most common species of Ironbark include Red Ironbark, Grey Ironbark, and Forest Red Gum Ironbark. These trees can grow to be very large, with some specimens reaching heights of over 40 meters. In addition to their valuable timber, Ironbark trees are also important for their ecological role in Australian ecosystems. They provide habitat for a wide range of native wildlife, including birds, insects, and mammals, and are an important source of food and shelter.


Ironbark timber is often sustainably harvested from managed forests and plantations, ensuring that this valuable resource can be used in a responsible and environmentally friendly manner. Ironbark is widely considered to be one of the hardest and most durable hardwood timbers in Australia. Ironbark (Eucalyptus spp.) is a group of around 30 species of hardwood trees that are native to Australia, and they are known for their extreme hardness, density, and strength.

Ironbark has a deep reddish-brown colour that is highly sought after. The colour can vary depending on the species, but in general, it has a rich, warm tone that is both elegant and rustic.



Redgum


Redgum (Eucalyptus camaldulensis) is a large hardwood tree species that is native to Australia. Redgum trees can grow up to 45 meters tall, with a trunk diameter of up to 2 meters. Redgum is a stunning natural timber, is commonly found, however a valuable and precious resource.




Greybox


Grey box (Eucalyptus moluccana) is a hardwood tree species that is native to eastern Australia, and is found primarily in New South Wales and Queensland. It is a medium-sized tree that can grow up to 30 meters tall, with a trunk diameter of up to 1.5 meters. The timber of grey box is highly valued for its strength, durability, and attractive appearance. It has a pale to dark brown colour, with a fine and even texture, and a straight grain pattern.



Spotted gum


Spotted gum (Corymbia maculata) is a hardwood tree species that is native to eastern Australia, from the New South Wales south coast up to the Queensland border. Spotted gum is typically a pale to dark brown colour, with distinctive spotted markings caused by the activity of longicorn beetles. It has a coarse and often wavy grain, with a relatively uniform texture. Spotted gum trees are large, growing up to 50 meters tall and with a trunk diameter of up to two meters. They are found in a wide range of habitats, from coastal forests to dry inland woodlands, and are a key species in many Australian ecosystems, providing important habitat for native wildlife.


The grain of spotted gum can vary depending on the species, but in general, it is moderately coarse and often interlocked, which creates a distinctive wavy or rippled pattern. This pattern is sometimes referred to as "fiddleback" or "catspaw" and can vary in intensity and frequency from tree to tree and even from board to board. The colour of spotted gum can also vary from pale to dark brown, with hints of yellow, green, or gray in some species.



Stringybark


One of the strongest of all Australian hardwoods. Stringybark is a common name for several species of eucalyptus trees that are native to Australia. These trees are characterized by their long, fibrous bark that often peels off in long, stringy strips. The timber from stringybark trees is typically a pale to medium brown colour, with a straight, moderately coarse grain. It is known for its strength and durability, with a Janka hardness rating of between 7,000 and 9,000 newtons. Stringybark trees are found in a range of habitats throughout Australia, from the coastal forests of the east coast to the dry inland woodlands. Some of the most common species of stringybark include Eucalyptus obliqua, Eucalyptus regnans, and Eucalyptus macrorhyncha.



Marri


Marri (Corymbia calophylla) is a hardwood tree species that is native to the state of Western Australia. Warm, and reddish-brown in colour, the grain patterns vary from straight and uniform to highly figured and feature-filled. Marri has a coarse texture and interlocking grain, which gives it a unique appearance and makes it highly sought after for decorative applications in homes.



Marri timber from Western Australia


Here are some of the reasons why Marri timber is considered beautiful:


Colour: Marri timber is known for its warm and rich colour palette, which ranges from light yellow to deep reddish-brown. The colour can vary depending on the age of the tree, with younger trees producing lighter-coloured timber and older trees producing darker-coloured timber. The sapwood is usually pale yellow, and the heartwood is typically reddish-brown.


Grain: Marri timber has a striking and unique grain pattern that is highly sought after. The grain is often wavy or interlocked, creating a beautiful, swirling pattern that adds visual interest and depth to the timber.


Character: Marri timber is valued for its natural character and features, which include gum veins, knots, and other irregularities that add to its rustic charm. These features give each piece of Marri timber a unique character and make it an attractive choice for furniture makers, designers, and homeowners.



Blackbutt


Found on the east coast of Australia, from Victoria to Queensland. Blackbutt is a stunning hardwood. Known for strength, durability, with a grain showing a middle level of grain character.

Blackbutt timber is usually pale to medium brown in colour. The grain includes uniform and straight lines and pattern, with the occasional gum vein and knot. Blackbutt is a versatile timber that is known for its high natural durability and resistance to termites.


Blackbutt trees grow up to 50 meters tall and have a trunk diameter of up to two meters. They’re huge! Common in forests and mountain areas, Blackbutt hardwood is an important element in the Australian ecosystems which it’s found.



Tallowood


Tallowood (Eucalyptus microcorys) is a hardwood species that is native to the east coast of Australia, from Queensland to New South Wales. Pale to dark yellow-brown colour, and with a moderately coarse and even texture, Tallowood is a beautiful timber. The grain is straight and uniform with the occasional knot. Tallowood is known for its high natural durability and resistance to termites and decay, making it a popular choice for outdoor applications, such as decking and fencing. Tallowood trees are very large, and can grow up to 60 meters tall with a trunk diameter of up to three meters.



Jarrah


Jarrah (Eucalyptus marginata) is the timber from a large tree up to 40 meters tall, with a trunk diameter of up to 3 meters. Famously native to the south west of Western Australia and for the colour, which has a distinctive deep, reddish-brown colour and interlocking grain. In addition to its practical qualities, Jarrah timber also has a rich cultural history. It has been used by Indigenous Australians for thousands of years for a wide range of purposes, from tools and weapons to ceremonial objects.


Home styles that suit Jarrah timber
  1. Rustic: with natural materials such as stone, old bricks or leather

  2. Modern: the rich, dark colour and clean lines of Jarrah complement minimalist themes

  3. Industrial: will add a touch of warmth the industrial interior design and pairs well with metal features and exposed concrete

  4. Coastal: the rustic natural characteristics of Jarrah will suit coastal home themes

  5. Traditional: warm and rich colours add elegance and quality


Benefits of choosing reclaimed timber


There are many benefits to using reclaimed timber, including:


Sustainability: Using reclaimed timber helps to conserve natural resources and reduce waste by repurposing existing materials. This reduces the need for new timber to be harvested from forests, which helps to preserve these important ecosystems.


Durability: Reclaimed timber is often old-growth timber that has had time to naturally dry and harden over time, making it denser and more durable than newly harvested timber. This means that it is less likely to warp or shrink and can provide a long-lasting and resilient building material.


Unique character: Reclaimed timber often has unique character and charm that cannot be replicated with new timber. The natural aging process, including exposure to weather and other environmental factors, can give reclaimed timber a unique colour, texture, and patina that adds warmth and character to any project.


History and heritage: Using reclaimed timber can help to preserve the history and heritage of a building or site by incorporating materials that have a story and a connection to the past. This can add cultural and historical value to a project and help to create a sense of place. Each piece of reclaimed timber has a story to tell.



Australian timber, why we love it


There is a deep passion behind Australian timbers, which comes from the unique qualities of the trees themselves and the cultural and historical significance they hold. Many Australian timbers are highly prized for their beauty, durability, and strength.


Australian timbers continue to be highly valued by craftspeople, artisans, and designers who appreciate the unique qualities of each species and the stories they tell. The passion behind Australian timbers is not just about the physical qualities of the wood, but also about the connection to the land and the history of the country, making them a truly special and meaningful material.



What to consider when choosing Australian timber to suit your interior home theme


The colour of the timber can have a big impact on the overall look and feel of your interior. Consider the colour palette of your home and choose a timber that complements or contrasts with the other colours in the space.




When choosing furniture to suit your home's interior theme, there are several factors to consider:


Style: Consider the overall style and aesthetic of your home and choose furniture that complements the look and feel of the space. For example, if your home has a modern or minimalist design, you may want to choose furniture with clean lines and simple designs, while if your home has a more traditional or classic style, you may want to choose furniture with more ornate details and embellishments.


Scale: Consider the size and scale of your space and choose furniture that is appropriately sized and proportioned. For example, if you have a small living room, you may want to choose a sofa and chairs that are more compact and streamlined, while if you have a large open-concept space, you may want to choose furniture that is more substantial and can fill the space.


Comfort: Consider the comfort level of the furniture and choose pieces that are comfortable and functional for your lifestyle. For example, if you enjoy lounging on the sofa to watch TV or read, you may want to choose a sofa with plush cushions and supportive backrests.


Materials: Consider the materials used in the construction of the furniture and choose pieces that are made from high-quality, durable materials that will stand up to everyday wear and tear. For example, if you have young children or pets, you may want to choose furniture that is stain-resistant and easy to clean.


Colour: Consider the colour palette of your home and choose furniture that complements or contrasts with the other colours in the space. For example, if your home has neutral walls and floors, you may want to choose furniture with bold or vibrant colours to add visual interest to the space.



Conclusion


By using these two sustainable and appealing materials, along with a design that facilitates easy flipping and playing, a Vinyl Station will encourage you to play more vinyl. Plus, we make all record cabinets in our workshops in Geelong and Melbourne in Australia.

We hope this information has helped you consider recycled post consumer plastic, or reclaimed Australian timber to craft a Vinyl Station. Please connect with Boris to discuss your thoughts more via email at boris@vinylstation.com.au

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